Sudan Emergency Relief

A government shutdown has had devastating effects on the daily lives of the Sudanese people.

Bodies are being dumped in the Nile River. Shops are closed and streets are unsafe, making basic necessities— such as food and medicine— very hard to find.

UMR is working swiftly to provide medical aid, food, and water to the people in Sudan. We must act now to provide much needed assistance.

Click here to donate to UMR’s Sudan Emergency Relief Fund.

 

In December, protests broke out in Sudan after an economic crisis emptied bank machines and forced the government to triple the price of bread. What started as a fight for bread prices soon morphed into a nationwide movement, resulting in President Omar al-Bashir being ousted. On June 3, the military council in Sudan tried to disperse the pro-democracy protesters in Khartoum by opening fire on the crowds and killing over 100 people, according to local doctors.

HIGHLIGHTS

  • Sudanese security forces brutally cleared a protest camp in Khartoum in the early hours of June 3
  • The Central Committee of Sudanese Doctors has estimated the death toll at 118 people as of June 12. Unfortunately, figures are rising!

 

On June 3, the military unit in Sudan tried to break the protests of the revolutionaries in Khartoum by opening fire on the crowds and killing over 100 people, according to local doctors.

One of the first victims of the massacre was 26-year-old engineer Mohamed Mattar.

Mattar was allegedly fatally shot by the Sudanese paramilitary Rapid Support Forces during the 3 June attacks. He was reportedly trying to protect two women at the time.

His favourite colour was blue, prompting a social media movement where the users turned their Twitter and Instagram profiles blue to honour his memory.

Using the hashtag #BlueForSudan, thousands of users have since joined the movement, including US singers Rihanna and Demi Lovato, who have shared statements of support with protesters.